2018 BBWAA Ballot @ SI.com

Part of my ongoing effort to catalog my Hall of Fame-related coverage at SI.com for this site. As this series is in progress, some articles have not yet been published.

Roundups

First look
JAWS intro
Joe Morgan’s Letter
My Virtual 2018 Ballot
Projecting 2018 results
Results: January 24
Player-by-Player
Next 5 Years

Candidates

One-and-Dones Part 1: Chris Carpenter, Livan Hernandez, Brad Lidge, Jason Isringhausen
One-and-Dones Part 2: Kevin Millwood, Jamie Moyer, Kerry Wood, Carlos Zambrano
One-and-Dones Part 3: Johnny Damon, Orlando Hudson, Aubrey Huff, Carlos Lee, Hideki Matsui

Barry Bonds
Roger Clemens
Vlad Guerrero
Trevor Hoffman
Andruw Jones
Chipper Jones
Jeff Kent
Edgar Martinez
Fred McGriff
Mike Mussina
Manny Ramirez
Scott Rolen 
Johan Santana
Curt Schilling
Gary Sheffield
Sammy Sosa
Jim Thome
Omar Vizquel
Billy Wagner
Larry Walker

2018 Modern Baseball Era Committee Ballot @ SI.com

Even for a process designed to reconsider long-retired players not elected via the writers’ ballot (managers, executives and umpires are included as well)— this feels like a particularly reheated slate. Six of the candidates have been considered via at least one Era Committee ballot before, namely Steve Garvey, Tommy John, Dave Parker, Ted Simmons, Luis Tiant and Marvin Miller, the lone non-player. While Don Mattingly, Jack Morris, Dale Murphy and Alan Trammell are all first-timers here, each spent the maximum 15 years on the BBWAA ballot, with Morris the only one coming anywhere close to the 75% needed for election by the end of his run:

Garvey, Mattingly and Tiant received their highest shares of the vote in their ballot debuts, with Parker and Murphy doing so in their second years. When the Hall announced the truncation of the 15-year eligibility window to 10 in the summer of 2014, Mattingly — who along with Trammell and Lee Smith was grandfathered in, as he was past the 10-year point — was down into single-digit percentages. In short, the candidacies of those players were arguments for a mercy rule.

Part 1: Tommy John, Luis Tiant, Ted Simmons

Part 2: Steve Garvey, Don Mattingly, Dale Murphy, Dave Parker

Part 3: Alan Trammell

Part 4: Jack Morris

Part 5: Marvin Miller

Results: Morris and Trammell elected

For all of the contentious debate that surrounded Jack Morris’ 15-year run on the BBWAA ballot, his election to the Hall of Fame via the Modern Baseball Era Committee—whose results were announced Sunday evening, from the Winter Meetings in Orlando, Florida—was inevitable, given the history of candidates who fell just short of 75% from the writers. On the other hand, the election of Morris’ longtime teammate, shortstop Alan Trammell, was a pleasant surprise given the lackadaisical support he received during his ballot tenure.

2013 BBWAA Ballot @ SI.com

Part of my ongoing effort to catalog my Hall of Fame-related coverage at SI.com for this site.

Roundups

A Ballot Weighty in Talent and Controversy
JAWS intro

My Virtual 2013 Ballot
An Alternative View
Results: a shutout

Candidates

One-and-Done Pitchers : Roberto Hernandez, Jose Mesa, Aaron Sele, Mike Stanton, Woody Williams
One-and-Done Hitters Part 1: Sandy Alomar Jr., Jeff Cirillo, Royce Clayton, Jeff Conine, Todd Walker
One-and-Done Hitters Part 2: Julio Franco, Shawn Green, Ryan Klesko, Rondell White, Reggie Sanders
Jeff Bagwell
Craig Biggio
Barry Bonds
Roger Clemens
Steve Finley
Kenny Lofton
Edgar Martinez
Don Mattingly
Fred McGriff
Mark McGwire
Jack Morris
Dale Murphy
Rafael Palmeiro
Mike Piazza
Tim Raines
Curt Schilling
Lee Smith
Sammy Sosa
Alan Trammell
Larry Walker
David Wells
Bernie Williams

2014 BBWAA Ballot @ SI.com

Part of my ongoing effort to catalog my Hall of Fame-related coverage at SI.com for this site.

Roundups

Master page

Burning Questions
JAWS intro
Why There’s a Backlog (and How to Fix It)
My Virtual 2014 Ballot
Best Classes Ever
Most Overlooked at Every Position
All One-and-Done Team
All What-Took-Them-So-Long Team
Election Day Guide
Results: Glavine, Maddux, Thomas elected
Next 5 Years
An Early Look at 2015

Candidates

One-and-Done Stray Hitters: Sean Casey, Paul Lo Duca, Richie Sexson, J.T. Snow
One-and-Done More Stray Hitters: Moises Alou, Ray Durham, Jacque Jones
One-and-Done Stray Relievers: Armando Benitez, Erig Gagne, Todd Jones, Mike Timlin
Jeff Bagwell
Craig Biggio
Barry Bonds
Roger Clemens
Tom Glavine
Luis Gonzalez
Jeff Kent
Greg Maddux
Edgar Martinez
Don Mattingly
Fred McGriff
Mark McGwire
Jack Morris
Mike Mussina
Hideo Nomo
Rafael Palmeiro
Mike Piazza
Tim Raines
Kenny Rogers
Curt Schilling
Lee Smith
Sammy Sosa
Frank Thomas
Alan Trammell
Larry Walker

2015 BBWAA Ballot @ SI.com

Part of my ongoing effort to catalog my Hall of Fame-related coverage at SI.com for this site.

Roundups

Master page

Burning Questions
JAWS intro
Below Standard Players
My Virtual 2015 Ballot
Election Day Guide
Results: Biggio, Johnson, Martinez, Smoltz elected
Candidate-by-Candidate
Next 5 Years

Candidates

One-and-Done Hitters: Rich Aurilia, Aaron Boone, Tony Clark, Jermaine Dye, Darin Erstad, Cliff Floyd
One-and-Done Pitchers: Jason Schmidt, Tom Gordon, Eddie Guardado, Troy Percival
Jeff Bagwell
Craig Biggio
Barry Bonds
Roger Clemens
Carlos Delgado
Nomar Garciaparra
Brian Giles
Randy Johnson
Jeff Kent
Edgar Martinez
Pedro Martinez
Don Mattingly
Fred McGriff
Mark McGwire
Mike Mussina
Mike Piazza
Tim Raines
Curt Schilling
Gary Sheffield
Lee Smith
John Smoltz
Sammy Sosa
Alan Trammell
Larry Walker

2016 BBWAA Ballot @ SI.com

Part of my ongoing effort to catalog my Hall of Fame-related coverage at SI.com for this site.

Roundups

Master page

First look
JAWS intro
My Virtual 2016 Ballot
Biggest Jumps in Voting History
Election Day Guide
Results: Griffey, Piazza elected
Player-by-Player
Next 5 Years

Candidates

One-and-Done Part 1: Brad Ausmus, Mike Sweeney, Luis Castillo, Mark Grudzielanek, David Eckstein
One-and-Done Part 2: Troy Glaus, Mike Lowell, Garret Anderson, Randy Winn, Mike Hampton
Jeff Bagwell
Barry Bonds
Roger Clemens
Jim Edmonds
Nomar Garciaparra
Ken Griffey Jr.
Trevor Hoffman
Jason Kendall
Jeff Kent
Edgar Martinez
Fred McGriff
Mark McGwire
Mike Mussina
Mike Piazza
Tim Raines
Curt Schilling
Gary Sheffield
Lee Smith
Sammy Sosa
Alan Trammell
Billy Wagner
Larry Walker

2017 BBWAA Ballot @ SI.com

Part of my ongoing effort to catalog my Hall of Fame-related coverage at SI.com for this site.

Master link

Roundups

First look
My Virtual 2017 Ballot
Projecting 2017 results
One-and-Dones in History
Results: Bagwell, Raines, Rodriguez elected
Player-by-Player
Next 5 Years
All-Overlooked Team (revised from 2014)

Candidates

One-and-Dones Part 1: Tim Wakefield, Arthur Rhodes, Jason Varitek, Derrek Lee and Freddy Sanchez
One-and-Dones Part 2: Orlando Cabrera, Edgar Renteria, Carlos Guillen, Melvin Mora and Casey Blake
One-and-Dones Part 3: Pat Burrell, Mike Cameron, J.D. Drew, Magglio Ordoñez and Matt Stairs
Jeff Bagwell
Barry Bonds
Roger Clemens
Vlad Guerrero
Trevor Hoffman
Jeff Kent
Edgar Martinez
Fred McGriff
Mike Mussina
Jorge Posada
Tim Raines (see also post-election profile)
Manny Ramirez
Ivan Rodriguez
Curt Schilling
Gary Sheffield
Lee Smith
Sammy Sosa
Billy Wagner
Larry Walker

2013 Pre-Integration Committee Ballot @ SI.com

Part of my ongoing effort to catalog my Hall of Fame-related coverage at SI.com for this site.

The 10 finalists up for discussion on the Pre-Integration Era ballot aren’t household names, but there are worthy candidates. Owners Sam Breadon (Cardinals) and Jacob Ruppert (Yankees), executive and equipment pioneer Al Reach and umpire Hank O’Day all have compelling cases. None of those spark the imagination or lend themselves to quantification the way the six former players — Bill Dahlen, Wes Ferrell, Marty Marion, Tony Mullane, Bucky Walters and Deacon White — do, however. Some of those six played during a time when the game’s rules were still evolving, making their raw statistics harder to parse, but advanced metrics can help provide context.

Part 1: Bill Dahlen, Marty Marion, Deacon White

Part 2: Wes Ferrell, Tony Mullane, Bucky Walters

Results: O’Day, Ruppert, White elected

2014 Expansion Era Committee Ballot @ SI.com

Part of my ongoing effort to catalog my Hall of Fame-related coverage at SI.com for this site.

Part 1: Dave Concepcion, Steve Garvey, Tommy John, Dave Parker, Dan Quisenberry, Ted Simmons, Joe Torre

Marvin Miller snubbed (managers Bobby Cox, Tony La Russa and Joe Torre elected)

This was the rare year that I did not get to profile every candidate before the election. However, I did cover the trio of managers briefly for SI’s Hall of Fame Commemorative Issue, which was designed to capitalize primarily on the election of the Braves’ Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine and Cox. Since it never made it online, here’s the section on the managers:

Before moving to managing, Torre accumulated a near-Hall of Fame resume as a player, earning All-Star honors nine times with the Braves (1960-1968), Cardinals (1969-1974) and Mets (1975-1977). He won the NL batting title and MVP honors in 1971, and finished his career with a .297/.365/.452 line (129 OPS+), 2,342 hits and 252 homers. Retiring in June 1977, shortly after being anointed player-manager of the Mets, he didn’t find much success in parts of five seasons at the helm in Flushing, but led the Braves to an NL West flag in 1982, and to an 88-win near-miss the following year before the axe fell at the end of 1984. He took to the broadcast booth from 1985-1990 before returning to the dugout with the Cardinals, but the best he could do in parts of six seasons at the helm in St. Louis was a second-place finish.

Torre was a career 109 games below .500 when he was hired to manage the Yankees in November 1995; the New York Daily News hailed him as “Clueless Joe” when he took the job with a team that had only just returned to the postseason for the first time in 14 years. Overseeing a homegrown nucleus that had begun developing during George Steinbrenner’s suspension — Bernie Williams, Andy Pettitte, Mariano Rivera, Derek Jeter and Jorge Posada — and unafraid to stand up to a boss who had changed managers 17 times since their last title, he guided the Yankees to the playoffs in each of his 12 seasons in the Bronx via 10 AL East flags and two Wild Card appearances. In his first year, he led the team to their first championship since 1978 with a World Series victory over Cox’s Braves. The Yankees went on to win four straight pennants from 1998-2001, winning the first three of those World Series and coming three outs away from the fourth; they added another pennant in 2003. They won 100 games four times, topped by a record 114 wins in 19998. After Torre fell out of favor in the Broxn following the 2007 season, he took over the Dodgers, guiding them to to NL West flags and Championship Series appearances before finally retiring in 2010 with a 2326-1997 record and a .538 winning percentage. His win total ranks fifth all-time, while his 15 postseason appearances are second (thanks to the advent of the current format), his four titles tied for fourth, and his six pennants tied for sixth.

A fiery dugout leader who eventually set the major league record with 159 managerial ejections, Cox spent 25 years as the manager of the Braves plus another four (1982-1985) piloting the Blue Jays, who won 99 games and the AL East flag in his final season there. He led the Braves to 14 NL East flags and one Wild Card appearance, giving him a record 16 postseason appearances in all. The Braves notched at least 100 wins on his watch six times, and took pennants in 1991, 1992, 1995, 1996 and 1999, but despite their stellar core of starting pitching, they won just one Fall Classic. They did bring home plenty of hardware, with Maddux, Glavine and Smoltz combining for five Cy Youngs under Cox, Terry Pendleton and Chipper Jones both winning MVPs, and David Justice and Rafael Furcal claiming Rookie of the Year honors. Cox retired with a 2504-2001 record — the fourth-highest win total of all time — and a .556 winning percentage.

La Russa was just 34 years old when he took over as the manager of the White Sox in mid-1979, one year after he earned a law degree from Florida Sate University. During his 33 years at the helm of the White Sox (1979-1986), A’s (1986-1995) and Cardinals (1996-2011), he changed the game via his innovative bullpen management. Once his starter tired, he used a parade of left- and right-handed specialists, strikeout artists and groundball machines, to create favorable matchups. While he didn’t invent the closer role, he refined it via his attempt to turn the game over to relief ace Dennis Eckersley with a clean slate at the start of the ninth inning. He won an AL West title with the White Sox in 1983, and led the A’s to three straight pennants from 1988-1990 — winning it all in 1989 — plus an AL West flag in 1992. In St. Louis, he led the Cardinals to seven NL Central titles, two Wild Card appearances, three pennants and two World Series wins. The last of those came in 2011 over the Rangers; La Russa promptly retired, thus becoming the first manager ever to go out on top. In all he compiled a record of 2728-2365 and a .536 winning percentage. Only Connie Mack managed (and lost) more games, only Mack and John McGraw won more, and only Cox and Torre took more teams to the postseason.

 

2015 Golden Era Committee Ballot @ SI.com

Part of my ongoing effort to catalog my Hall of Fame-related coverage at SI.com for this site.

The Golden Era is one of three periods defined by the Hall when it split the Veterans Committee into three subcommittees in 2010. It covers those candidates whose careers had their greatest impact between 1947 and 1972; the other periods are the Pre-Integration Era (up to 1946) and the Expansion Era (1973 onward). Candidates from each era are considered on a triennial cycle; the last Golden Era vote, conducted in December 2011, saw Ron Santo finally elected, albeit a year after he had passed away.

Part 1: Dick Allen, Ken Boyer, Gil Hodges, Bob Howsam, Jim Kaat

Part 2: Minnie Minoso, Tony Oliva, Billy Pierce, Luis Tiant, Maury Wills

Results (another shutout)

Minnie Minoso obit (March 2015)